on technique

There can never be enough said on photographic technique.

Photography is widely recognized as a form of art, a profession and a hobby.

This immediately implies that, in order to make successful photographs, one would need talent, experience and dedication, as well as passion.

Canon 20D, 50mm f/1.8, 1/200, f/2, ISO 100

1/200, f/2, ISO 100, flash OFF, Canon 20D, 50mm f/1.8

The photographic process is counter intuitive. We are all used to seeing and reacting to what we see. We never question that ability.

A camera, as advanced as it may be, is a recording device that can capture only a small part of what the human eye can see. It is also completely impartial to whatever drama or joy unfolds in front of it.

To make a long philosophy short: we try to capture moments. For ourselves, for our viewers, whatever. To create an image that will remind us (or share with others) exactly what we felt at that particular moment and place.

1/500, f/5.6, ISO1250, flash OFF, Nikon D700, 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6 VR

1/500, f/5.6, ISO1250, flash OFF, Nikon D700, 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6 VR

In order to achieve that and be satisfied with the result, one needs to master every step of the photographic process.

Understanding exposure elements (shutter speed, aperture, ISO) is only the first step. Adding and subtracting light, while watching the effect each of those elements has on the image you envisioned, requires a lot of practice, regardless of talent. Once you acquire that wonderful skill, you can really concentrate on the artistic, the human element of photography.

1/50, f/5.6, ISO1400, Flash OFF, Nikon D700, 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6 VR

1/50, f/5.6, ISO1400, Flash OFF, Nikon D700, 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6 VR

Having a certain camera or lens will matter only to the extent to which it assists you to develop and use those skills in making images that you are satisfied with.  In creating files that you can process easily to obtain the image you envisioned. Even in the days of film, post processing was an integral part of successful photography. People spent hours in the dark room working on prints, just as you spend a considerable amount of time in front of Lightroom or Picasa or Gimp, to make an image that you are satisfied with.

There are no shortcuts.

Photography is mainly about solving problems.

1/2, f/4, ISO200, Flash OFF, Olympus E-620, 9-18mm f/4-5.6

1/2, f/4, ISO200, Flash OFF, Olympus E-620, 9-18mm f/4-5.6

Think about it this way: during that 1/250th of a second (click), you need to be sure you have good exposure for highlights, enough details in the shadows, a steady hand, good light on the subject, pleasing contrast, focus on the right area and enough depth of field, good composition, a pleasing and undistracting background, high enough speed to freeze action or low enough speed to achieve certain effects, correct flash exposure (if flash is used), the list can go on and on. And that is before we start to discuss the merits of subject, be it landscape, portraiture, macro or any other of the many photographic disciplines.

The complexity and beauty is endless. Just take a look at 500px.com or 1x.com, as an example of the many sites that bring you new and astounding images every day, from professional and amateur photographers all over the world.

1/50, f/16, ISO800, Flash OFF, Canon Kiss X4, Canon FD 50mm f/3.5 macro on extension tube

1/50, f/16, ISO800, Flash OFF, Canon Kiss X4, Canon FD 50mm f/3.5 macro on extension tube

On this page i will share posts that describe what i have learned and techniques i use to achieve a certain result. By no means do i intend to establish a right or wrong way of doing things, but to share how i have managed to solve photographic situations and discuss them with other photographers, in the hope of learing more and improving.

Enjoy and i will be looking forward to your comments.

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